top of page
  • Writer's pictureLaura Lindenmann

7 tips for working with a graphic designer.



 


1. A PICTURE IS WORTH 1000 WORDS


You would like a certain style in your design, but can't put it into words? A picture gives me the opportunity to understand your vision and capture all the artistic nuances and techniques that you like so that we can integrate them into your project. On Pinterest you will find many ideas and impressions that you are welcome to show me in advance to convey your vision to me.


 

2. TIMING & DETAILS



Do you still have questions about cooperation? Is everything necessary such as schedules, payments, correction rounds, etc. clarified? If you still have unanswered questions, it is best to ask them before starting the cooperation to avoid ambiguities.


 

3. FEEDBACK & CORRECTIONS


Even the best designers don't always meet your ideas the first time. Most projects require at least one round of feedback. In order to advance this process in the best possible way, it is advisable to formulate your feedback clearly. In other words, clearly describe what bothers you or WHAT you are still missing, but don't say HOW to fix it. Let's say you are evaluating a new redesign of your website. Good feedback could be: "We need a call-to-action on the home page." Not so good feedback would be: "Put a big, red button right there!" Your designer is an expert in design. By telling him what to do, you not only ignore his expertise, but also prevent him from thinking about the best solution. If it's time for feedback, point out what you need, but don't make the revisions for the designer yourself.



 

4. YOUR ENERGY IS MY ENERGY


Your energy and enthusiasm also give me energy. The more positive and constructive the cooperation, the more passionate I can work on your project and achieve the best result. I work on every project with a lot of passion and passion.



 

5. PROCESSING TIME


Customers often don't know how long it takes to create graphics. Sometimes it only takes an hour to design something. Sometimes it can take several hours to make just a few changes. Often, however, designers take between three days and two weeks to complete a design project and many designers even charge an urgent fee if you want to finish a little faster than planned.


Keep in mind that your designer probably not only your project, but several at the same time. If you are not sure how long your project will take, contact your designer and ask for a realistic timing that you can both stick to. Your designer will contact you with new designs by the next agreed time and has not forgotten you. Promised.


 


6. CONSULTING


You want a change, but I won't do it right away? If your designer questions a change request and talks to you, then he doesn't do it because he didn't understand you or doesn't want to execute your instruction. He does this to get to the bottom of the problem. Designers are trained to solve problems visually. Most likely, he already has many other options in mind on how to eliminate the problem and wants to determine which solution is the best. He will then inform you of this and explain it in detail. A good designer is someone who thinks along with every decision and doesn't just do anything blindly. Rely on his good education and expertise and trust his advice. Rest assured that he clearly shows not only your wish, but above all the needs of your target group and always takes them into account. This is extremely important for your business and so you can be sure that nothing stands in the way of the success of your project visually.



 


7. TRUST


It is common for customers to have a firm idea of what they want and they hire a designer to create this idea. However, graphic design is a complicated discipline and chances are good that the designer knows something about your vision, which you have not yet considered. Your idea may not be 100% feasible, or, more likely, your designer's idea could actually work better than your original idea. Trust in your designer's skills. Of course, your idea is very valuable, but it is better to mix your ideas with those of an expert than stubbornly stick to a second-class concept. What your designer shows you may not be what you originally imagined - but that can be very good!






12 views0 comments
bottom of page